The sophisticated Eight

You have to know a bit about sonata structures and how some musical forms operate, but Beethoven’s 5th symphony is a musical revolution – breaking the traditional rules and structurally setting up powerful conflicts. This is the creativity of the man who breaks all the rules and then becomes the norm. Sometimes creativity has a destructive component and eights don’t mind that much.

Loyal like a Six

The high side of style six is loyalty. Sixes keep the home fires burning, they are law n order defenders, they don’t seek the spotlight. And, as you hear below, they are capable of being good friends without a lot of conditions. This friendship is not based on the other’s need, like style Two might exercise, (there is that promise, though) or mutual benefit, as a Three might think about it. It’s a lovely simple statement that we are friends and you can count on me, no matter what.
http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XHlcW_lKPl4&feature=related

Sunshine for Sevens

One of the things that characterize Sevens is their optimism. That’s a bit different from being happy here and now. The happiness lies at least partially in the future. Here’s a poetic spelling out of the expectations that no matter what has happened or is happening, it’s going to get good pretty soon now.

How Nines feel it

Donna Barton says:

I think this song has many qualities of an unseen, unheard, no-space-for-me, passive aggressiveness of a nine. Also, it shows how the nine projects onto everybody is own feeling of I’m-in-the-way. Wow, how much the nine does NOT want things to get real. After finding his last item he says, “I’m about to check out…” and this is literal and psychological! ~Donna


(The Whole Foods Parking Lot song)

This is perceptive and helpful.  Thank you, Donna!

 

Fours dwell in the past

Roy Orbison’s hit song, I can’t stop loving you, is almost a clinical description of the inner life of a Four. The line that I found most revealing was “I made up my mind to live in memory.” Fours can easily slip into wallowing in past miseries, injustices and lost loves. Here’s Orbison telling you that beautifully.

Five’s lament

Simon says this is neurotic, and perhaps it is, but it is a very specific neurosis – a Five gone to a low place. Fives seem to think a good defense is the way to success. At least some of them do, and here is one who does.

Three: set to music

Here Fogarty catches the longing of style three to “get in the game,” and to excel – play centerfield, the most important outfielder position. Then he betrays part of style 3’s motivation: look at me, I can do this.” The desire to excel is accompanied by a desire to be SEEN excelling. The high energy is the inner motor of style three, too.
See what you think:

Four, IV and 4

Lisa Markhlouf sent me a song that reads much like a Four’s lament. Then if you listen to the music on YouTube that is Fourish also. The song is apparently Russian, as the comments are frequently in Cyrillic. Russia as a culture is quite 4ish, So this song is a 4 on three levels! Thank you Lisa!

[Gotye:]
Now and then I think of when we were together

Here’s the link to listen. And watch the video.


Like when you said you felt so happy you could die
Told myself that you were right for me
But felt so lonely in your company
But that was love and it’s an ache I still remember

You can get addicted to a certain kind of sadness
Like resignation to the end, always the end
So when we found that we could not make sense
Well you said that we would still be friends
But I’ll admit that I was glad it was over

But you didn’t have to cut me off
Make out like it never happened and that we were nothing
And I don’t even need your love
But you treat me like a stranger and I feel so rough
No you didn’t have to stoop so low
Have your friends collect your records and then change your number
I guess that I don’t need that though
Now you’re just somebody that I used to know

Now you’re just somebody that I used to know
Now you’re just somebody that I used to know

[Kimbra:]
Now and then I think of all the times you screwed me over
Part of me believing it was always something that I’d done
But I don’t wanna live that way
Reading into every word you say
You said that you could let it go
And I wouldn’t catch you hung up on somebody that you used to know

[Gotye:]
But you didn’t have to cut me off
Make out like it never happened and that we were nothing
And I don’t even need your love
But you treat me like a stranger and I feel so rough
And you didn’t have to stoop so low
Have your friends collect your records and then change your number
I guess that I don’t need that though
Now you’re just somebody that I used to know

[x2]
Somebody
(I used to know)
Somebody
(Now you’re just somebody that I used to know)

(I used to know)
(That I used to know)
(I used to know)
Somebody

Nine on Mother’s Day

The Beatles: “When I find myself in trouble, Mother Mary comes to me. Speaking words of comfort, ‘Let it be, let it be.'”
This captures some features of style Nine: a baseline search for comfort, a passive or at least receptive attitude and perhaps even the fatalism that plagues some Nines. And if, as some say, “Mother Mary” is marijuana, that makes even more sense. Weed may be what the rest of us use to feel like Nines once in a while.

First responder

I asked the “crowd” for examples of songs that illustrated an Enneagram habit. Here is the first suggestion from Deborah Pollard. The song is “I’m sexy and I know it, I work out.” The lyrics that reveal the preoccupation with being seen — a Three focus — are as follows:
I’m sexy and I know it
When I walk on by
the girls be looking like damn he fly
I pay to the beat, walk in on the street
with in my new freak, yeah!
Girls, look at the body (X3)
Girl look at that body — I work out (X3)
When I walk in the spot, this is what I see,
Everybody stops and they starin at me.
I got passion in my pants
and I ain’t afraid to show it.
I’m sexy and I know it.

What makes this tell-tale three is the focus on being seen by others as a form of validation.
Thanks, Deb.