It’s about time – 9s

Nines live very much in the present and are not totally conscious of time. Many Nines are habitually late because they don’t pay attention to external time unless being late will cause painful conflict.

It’s about time – 8

Style eights worry less about time than most other styles. They focus on what they want and feel they have the right to do it for as long as they want or need to. They are aware of external time but subordinate time constraints to their agenda. At times, however, because they see the world as a battlefield, they will get angry at time constraints as though time were an enemy.

Busted – 7

Here’s what you might have noticed.

Perhaps the single greatest feeling in my life came on the the first day of my first (of three) “quit your job and backpack the world for months” trips.

My friend and I had arrived on one-way tickets to London the night before. It was a beautiful day and we were sitting in St. James Park trying to decide what to do. And not just what to do that day but what to do in the weeks and months to come.

It was exhilarating. With no plans, we were literally just throwing out ideas: (multiple options a 7 speciality) let’s go to Marrakech, they say Prague is beautiful, can we get above the Arctic Circle?, could we take the Trans-Siberian railroad?

We ended up doing all those things, and I saw and experienced things that changed (and I think improved) me forever. But to be honest, none of those topped that incredible feeling of freedom we had that morning of infinite potential. (Always a trap for 7s)

I don’t believe there is any other way to get that feeling than to full-on commit to a step-into-the-void, open-ended, I’ll-know-where-I’m-going-when-I-get-there adventure.

• One of the worst feelings I’ve ever had has happened to me on all three of my multi-month trips. And each time I felt it, I knew it was time to go home. It is the flip side of the freedom coin.

The first time I was in Shanghai—seven months into my trip—walking to the train station. Suddenly I became acutely aware that every single person who was hustling along that sidewalk was going somewhere or doing something that mattered. Except for me.

They were going to work. To meet friends. To see the doctor. To play soccer. Whatever. I felt rootless, decadent and parasitic spending my days, weeks, months wandering through museums and temples.

I could not wait to get back to work, to relationships, to family, to permanence. Flight into health, probably a connection to style One)

I don’t believe there’s any other way to appreciate the importance of purpose and community other than to consciously cut those ties and float free of them for a while. Sevens, like many children, love “freedom from” and don’t quite get “freedom for,” until they get older and /or healthier.

Busted -7

Here is a clip from Quora in which a Seven indulges himself and then learns a bit. How many “7” feelings can you spot? Perhaps the single greatest feeling in my life came on the the first day of my first (of three) “quit your job and backpack the world for months” trips.

My friend and I had arrived on one-way tickets to London the night before. It was a beautiful day and we were sitting in St. James Park trying to decide what to do. And not just what to do that day but what to do in the weeks and months to come.

It was exhilarating. With no plans, we were literally just throwing out ideas: let’s go to Marrakech, they say Prague is beautiful, can we get above the Arctic Circle?, could we take the Trans-Siberian railroad?

We ended up doing all those things, and I saw and experienced things that changed (and I think improved) me forever. But to be honest, none of those topped that incredible feeling of freedom we had that morning of infinite potential.

I don’t believe there is any other way to get that feeling than to full-on commit to a step-into-the-void, open-ended, I’ll-know-where-I’m-going-when-I-get-there adventure.

• One of the worst feelings I’ve ever had has happened to me on all three of my multi-month trips. And each time I felt it, I knew it was time to go home. It is the flip side of the freedom coin.

The first time I was in Shanghai—seven months into my trip—walking to the train station. Suddenly I became acutely aware that every single person who was hustling along that sidewalk was going somewhere or doing something that mattered. Except for me.

They were going to work. To meet friends. To see the doctor. To play soccer. Whatever. I felt rootless, decadent and parasitic spending my days, weeks, months wandering through museums and temples.

I could not wait to get back to work, to relationships, to family, to permanence.

I don’t believe there’s any other way to appreciate the importance of purpose and community other than to consciously cut those ties and float free of them for a while.

It’s about time – 7

For Sevens, time is elastic. Sevens expand time within their mind and then fill their expanding (imaginary) time with real tasks. Even if they have a full schedule, if someone suggests one more thing, they emotionally assume they can “fit it in.” This frequently leads to over-scheduling, skipping out on some (inner or outer) commitments. Hint to Sevens. If you do this, your early warning signal is a “hurry up” feeling, that you should do more, do faster, and get more done. If this happens, Sevens procrastinate (the word means to put off until tomorrow) and that substitutes for prioritizing.

It’s about time – 6

Sixes seem to see time as an obligation. Is there enough time to get everything I have to do finished? The “have to do” is in the sense of necessity, it’s not like saying “I have to get a haircut.” It is more like “This is my allotted time to fulfill my obligations. Sixes often can not get started on difficult tasks because they see them as larger than (their) life.
Planning is crucial to the life of a Six. If the plans are detailed, then they have allotted the right amount of time and they are safe and won’t be caught unprepared. Sixes can use planning to alleviate anxiety.

About time – 5

Fives use both space and time as boundaries. Fives like to know ahead of time who will be at a party; they do not usually like surprises. They don’t care for surprises because it feels a bit like an invasion of their privacy. Fives have very clear boundaries, are often even “overbounded” in the sense they can tend to isolate. To protect themselves from unwanted intrusions into their life, they frequently schedule carefully and allow plenty of time for privacy and even solitude.

About time – 5

I was riding on a plane, talking to this dentist about the Enneagram. He was a 5, interested in new information, of course. I asked him for a metaphor for his life. He responded, “I am a battery; other people drain me.”
Fives have a tendency to divide time into several compartments: when I can be alone and when I am with others. They frequently protect privacy and solitude, enjoying either…IF…there is enough time alone. If you are a Five and an introvert, Elizabeth Wagele’s book, The Happy Introvert will interest you.

It’s about time – 4

Fours usually would not be considered particularly time-conscious. Their search is for emotional intensity, not duration. So a meeting to handle mundane affairs will not loom as important on their calendar as a brief conversation with someone who is emotionally important.
Fours can learn from liturgies, both religious and secular. Worship time or game time are intense and important, may I say “temporal orgasms?” Big buildup (how many hours of talk do we devote to the superbowl or March madness?) and then a savoring of the experience in memory. The actual length of time is irrelevant – how intense was the moment?
Time measures activity in the external world. Fours focus on the internal world where the clock is not master.

It’s about time – 3

If you are in the USA, you know how Threes see time. It is currency. Time is money. Threes see spending time with the same metrics they measure money. We spend time and money, we waste time and money, we save time and money.
Leisure is not a rhythmic part of life, it is a commodity that we can afford or not afford. Threes become workaholic in order to retire and have leisure time, they frequently do not take time off.
Threes thus see time as uniform: if you want more money, you spend more time. All time is clock time and our corporations used to have clocks you punched in on, because the employer was buying your time. Productivity is a separate matter. It is important but is usually correlated with the amount of time spent. (Not creativity or engagement which are harder to calibrate).